1. 17:18 2nd May 2014

    Notes: 251

    Reblogged from thinksquad

    There can be no consent where it can’t be withdrawn.
    — Miguel Duque (via thinksquad)

    (Source: paleolibertarian)

     
  2. 17:16

    Notes: 3749

    Reblogged from thinksquad

     
  3. 17:14

    Notes: 1135

    Reblogged from thinksquad

    thinksquad:

    Another researcher who has documented the power of self-directed learning is Sugata Mitra. He set up outdoor computers in very poor neighborhoods in India, where most children did not go to school and many were illiterate. Wherever he placed such a computer, dozens of children would gather around and, with no help from adults, figure out how to use it. Those who could not read began to do so through interacting with the computer and with other children around it. The computers gave the children access to the whole world’s knowledge — in one remote village, children who previously knew nothing about microorganisms learned about bacteria and viruses through their interactions with the computer and began to use this new knowledge appropriately in conversations.

    Mitra’s experiments illustrate how three core aspects of human nature — curiosity, playfulness and sociability — can combine beautifully to serve the purpose of education. Curiosity drew the children to the computer and motivated them to explore it; playfulness motivated them to practice many computer skills; and sociability allowed each child’s learning to spread like wildfire to dozens of other children.

    http://www.salon.com/2013/08/26/school_is_a_prison_and_damaging_our_kids/

     
  4. 17:14

    Notes: 1661

    Reblogged from knowledgeequalsblackpower

     
  5. 17:13

    Notes: 241

    Reblogged from thoughtsofablackgirl

    thoughtsofablackgirl:

Black ballerinas, Ashley Murphy, Ebony Williams and Misty Copeland on the cover of Pointe for June/July 2014. This is tooo perfect

    thoughtsofablackgirl:

    Black ballerinas, Ashley Murphy, Ebony Williams and Misty Copeland on the cover of Pointe for June/July 2014. This is tooo perfect

     
  6. 17:13

    Notes: 761

    Reblogged from atane

    streetetiquette:

    New Yorkers Joshua Kissi (24) and Travis Gumbs(24) embody together the successful men fashion website Street Etiquette , which was featured in detail in a 2011 article in The New York Times .  Joshua Kissi  parents are originally from Ghana, but he grew up in the Bronx and now lives in Brooklyn. Travis Gumbs was born on St. Kitts in the Caribbean and grew like Joshua in the Bronx, and also lives in Brooklyn. The gentleman are proud of their roots and want to serve with their look, taste and cultural background as a guide to good taste. We were able to accompany the dandies a day in New York, get to know better and look at their interesting life over their shoulders. —

    Follow us as we visit their old neighborhood and high school. — About Now De.

    (Source: about-now.de)

     
  7. 17:11

    Notes: 112842

    Reblogged from bkcarib

    benfoldssweaters:

    hey arnold was way too real

    (Source: yeahnofuckthat)

     
  8. 17:04

    Notes: 30452

    Reblogged from hussieologist

    image: Download

    pinkocommiebullshit:

Tumblr -
This elderly man with Alzheimer’s is missing from the DC metro area.
His name is John S. Matthews.
Age: 88
Race: Black
Height: 5’10
Weight: 155 pounds
Hair: Grey
Eyes: Brown
If you have any information, please call (202) 577-7847, (202) 340-4246, (202) 246-0118, or the police.
He was last seen wearing a red ski vest, blue sweater, and tan corduroy pants.
Please pass this information along. The more people who see the information, the more likely he will return home safely.

    pinkocommiebullshit:

    Tumblr -

    This elderly man with Alzheimer’s is missing from the DC metro area.

    His name is John S. Matthews.

    Age: 88

    Race: Black

    Height: 5’10

    Weight: 155 pounds

    Hair: Grey

    Eyes: Brown

    If you have any information, please call (202) 577-7847, (202) 340-4246, (202) 246-0118, or the police.

    He was last seen wearing a red ski vest, blue sweater, and tan corduroy pants.

    Please pass this information along. The more people who see the information, the more likely he will return home safely.

     
  9.  
  10.  
  11. 23:59 27th Apr 2014

    Notes: 9678

    Reblogged from oreides

    
Poverty tourism is only the most recent form of the evolution of the particular fascination (stand well back, but let us peer at you, curiously) that the upper classes have with the lower. The current mutation of poverty tourism includes a well meaning, upper/middle class, first world people, who are for whatever reason turned onto going to Africa (and it’s always Africa, isn’t it) to learn about how the starving children that show up on their TVs and their destitute parents live.
From Kennedy Odede, a Kenyan university student:
“Slum tourism has its advocates, who say it promotes social awareness. And it’s good money, which helps the local economy. 
 But it’s not worth it. Slum tourism turns poverty into entertainment, something that can be momentarily experienced and then escaped from. People think they’ve really “seen” something — and then go back to their lives and leave me, my family and my community right where we were before”

    Poverty tourism is only the most recent form of the evolution of the particular fascination (stand well back, but let us peer at you, curiously) that the upper classes have with the lower. The current mutation of poverty tourism includes a well meaning, upper/middle class, first world people, who are for whatever reason turned onto going to Africa (and it’s always Africa, isn’t it) to learn about how the starving children that show up on their TVs and their destitute parents live.

    From Kennedy Odede, a Kenyan university student:

    “Slum tourism has its advocates, who say it promotes social awareness. And it’s good money, which helps the local economy.

    But it’s not worth it. Slum tourism turns poverty into entertainment, something that can be momentarily experienced and then escaped from. People think they’ve really “seen” something — and then go back to their lives and leave me, my family and my community right where we were before”

     
  12. 23:58

    Notes: 4676

    Reblogged from whatisthat-velvet

    Black literature is taught as sociology, as tolerance, not as a serious, rigorous art form.
    — Toni Morrison (via missturman)
     
  13. 23:57

    Notes: 112152

    Reblogged from tighttwink

    stickysheep:

    soapbutts:

    loreface:

    runningoffthereeses:

    well, thats enough internet for today

    good. yes.

    OH. Plant monster dingus.

    Hi I want a million of these pillows and I want to send them out to my family.

     
  14. 23:53

    Notes: 23639

    Reblogged from blackgirlsrpretty2

    image: Download

     
  15. 23:52

    Notes: 11

    Reblogged from iwanttobelikearollingstone

    image: Download

    moviemezzanine:

TRIBECA REVIEW: Exploring Afro-Latino Identity in Pelo Malo and Manos Sucias
by Monica Castillo
Like their neighbors to the north, Latin America struggles with racism. Afro-Latinos are less likely to see themselves represented in positions of power, in mass media, or live in the best parts of town because of discrimination. Much of the same structural inequality that affects African-Americans repeat themselves in the former colonial Spanish, French, and Portuguese territories.
Two Tribeca Film Festival imports from Venezuela and Colombia explore these themes on the personal level, in the different ways Afro-Latinos may face prejudice, the scarcity of resources in impoverished communities, or the internalized desire to look more European or to live in better neighborhoods. These subtle commentaries depict the lived-in cost of racism in the day-to-day lives of the storytellers. We feel the entrapment of the brothers from Beneventura facing life or death decisions at the bottom rung of the drug trade or Junior’s frustrating grasps for self-expression in his stifling home. Pelo Malo and Manos Sucias explore a multi-faceted Afro-Latino identity stripped of machismo fronting, allowed to cry and struggle, but powerful enough to admit frailty. In a culture that prizes hypermasculinity, this vulnerability is perhaps the best story of these movies.
Grades: A & A-
Click here for the rest of Monica’s double-review.

    moviemezzanine:

    TRIBECA REVIEW: Exploring Afro-Latino Identity in Pelo Malo and Manos Sucias

    by Monica Castillo

    Like their neighbors to the north, Latin America struggles with racism. Afro-Latinos are less likely to see themselves represented in positions of power, in mass media, or live in the best parts of town because of discrimination. Much of the same structural inequality that affects African-Americans repeat themselves in the former colonial Spanish, French, and Portuguese territories.

    Two Tribeca Film Festival imports from Venezuela and Colombia explore these themes on the personal level, in the different ways Afro-Latinos may face prejudice, the scarcity of resources in impoverished communities, or the internalized desire to look more European or to live in better neighborhoods. These subtle commentaries depict the lived-in cost of racism in the day-to-day lives of the storytellers. We feel the entrapment of the brothers from Beneventura facing life or death decisions at the bottom rung of the drug trade or Junior’s frustrating grasps for self-expression in his stifling home. Pelo Malo and Manos Sucias explore a multi-faceted Afro-Latino identity stripped of machismo fronting, allowed to cry and struggle, but powerful enough to admit frailty. In a culture that prizes hypermasculinity, this vulnerability is perhaps the best story of these movies.

    Grades: A & A-

    Click here for the rest of Monica’s double-review.