1. 09:53 15th Apr 2014

    Notes: 9319

    Reblogged from dalepod

    nun-final:

    Some claim that evolution is just a theory, as if it were merely an opinion.

     
  2. 09:53

    Notes: 41902

    Reblogged from jade-terrace

    image: Download

    (Source: yungwifey)

     
  3. 09:51

    Notes: 4035

    Reblogged from pisstophwaltz

     
  4. 09:49

    Notes: 6619

    Reblogged from facewith-aview

    (Source: nedafeedinghope)

     
  5. 09:48

    Notes: 272

    Reblogged from dalepod

    image: Download

    joshbyard:

Flexible, Efficient Thermoelectric Generators to Power Next-Gen Wearable Devices

How to supply power in a stable and reliable manner is one of the most critical issues to commercialize wearable devices.
A team of KAIST researchers [have developed] a glass fabric-based thermoelectric (TE) generator that is extremely light and flexible and produces electricity from the heat of the human body. In fact, it is so flexible that the allowable bending radius of the generator is as low as 20 mm. There are no changes in performance even if the generator bends upward and downward for up to 120 cycles.
To date, two types of TE generators have been developed based either on organic or inorganic materials. The organic-based TE generators use polymers that are highly flexible and compatible with human skin, ideal for wearable electronics. The polymers, however, have a low power output. Inorganic-based TE generators produce a high electrical energy, but they are heavy, rigid, and bulky.
Professor Cho came up with a new concept and design technique to build a flexible TE generator that minimizes thermal energy loss but maximizes power output. His team synthesized liquid-like pastes of n-type (Bi2Te3) and p-type (Sb2Te3) TE materials and printed them onto a glass fabric by applying a screen printing technique. The pastes permeated through the meshes of the fabric and formed films of TE materials in a range of thickness of several hundreds of microns. As a result, hundreds of TE material dots (in combination of n and p types) were printed and well arranged on a specific area of the glass fabric.

(via Future wearable devices to be powered from your body heat using flexible glass fabrics ht futuristech-info)

    joshbyard:

    Flexible, Efficient Thermoelectric Generators to Power Next-Gen Wearable Devices

    How to supply power in a stable and reliable manner is one of the most critical issues to commercialize wearable devices.

    A team of KAIST researchers [have developed] a glass fabric-based thermoelectric (TE) generator that is extremely light and flexible and produces electricity from the heat of the human body. In fact, it is so flexible that the allowable bending radius of the generator is as low as 20 mm. There are no changes in performance even if the generator bends upward and downward for up to 120 cycles.

    To date, two types of TE generators have been developed based either on organic or inorganic materials. The organic-based TE generators use polymers that are highly flexible and compatible with human skin, ideal for wearable electronics. The polymers, however, have a low power output. Inorganic-based TE generators produce a high electrical energy, but they are heavy, rigid, and bulky.

    Professor Cho came up with a new concept and design technique to build a flexible TE generator that minimizes thermal energy loss but maximizes power output. His team synthesized liquid-like pastes of n-type (Bi2Te3) and p-type (Sb2Te3) TE materials and printed them onto a glass fabric by applying a screen printing technique. The pastes permeated through the meshes of the fabric and formed films of TE materials in a range of thickness of several hundreds of microns. As a result, hundreds of TE material dots (in combination of n and p types) were printed and well arranged on a specific area of the glass fabric.

    (via Future wearable devices to be powered from your body heat using flexible glass fabrics ht futuristech-info)

     
  6. 09:45

    Notes: 64

    Reblogged from artslant

    image: Download

    artslantstreet:

Huge Installation In Pakistan Brings Drone Operators Face-to-face With Their Targets: http://bit.ly/1qgQEfr

    artslantstreet:

    Huge Installation In Pakistan Brings Drone Operators Face-to-face With Their Targets: http://bit.ly/1qgQEfr

     
  7. 09:42

    Notes: 2277

    Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia

     
  8. 09:42

    Notes: 7

    Reblogged from rlyfake

    rlyfake:

    my mom heard about the synagogue shooting just now in the car and started crying

     
  9. 09:41

    Notes: 1434

    Reblogged from onlinecounsellingcollege

    Don’t believe everything you think.
    — Unknown (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
     
  10. 09:40

    Notes: 143

    Reblogged from magictransistor

    image: Download

    magictransistor:

老祠堂
     
  11. 09:40

    Notes: 1098

    Reblogged from cuntsnatch

    (Source: dragon-rising)

     
  12. 08:22

    Notes: 3954

    Reblogged from cookiesandcrack

    words-of-emotion:

Good Vibes HERE
     
  13. 08:20

    Notes: 2128

    Reblogged from liveinthemoment93

    robynhoodscloset:

    Here’s a little preview of our DEVO WEVO (http://devowevo.com) sleepover/shoot party!! These shots were mostly taken by alexkoby

    Featuring my wittle sis cookiesandcrack and my best friend http://anti-matter.tumblr.com/

    More pixxx to come from this shoot…..we were so drunk lol

     
  14. James Surowiecki: Assessing the American Dream : The New Yorker

    James Surowiecki: Assessing the American Dream : The New Yorker

     
  15. 14:05

    Notes: 2186

    Reblogged from homonoire

    There is something about poverty that smells like death. Dead dreams dropping off the heart like leaves in a dry season and rotting around the feet; impulses smothered too long in the fetid air of underground caves. The soul lives in a sickly air. People can be slave-ships in shoes.
    — Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography (New York:  HarperCollins, 1996), 87. (Originally published 1942)

    (Source: vigilanteespresso)